Is Organizational change in the works? Here’s how True Colors can help

Change is inevitable

Like death and taxes, change is inevitable, and, by its very nature is disruptive. While some people are able to adapt, there are others who begrudgingly white knuckle their way through the pain of change and in the process experience a great deal of stress. 

People don’t resist change, they resist being changed

Peter Bregman

Change requires us to abandon routine

Change requires us to abandon our routines.  It shakes up what we know and in some cases trust, and demands that we adopt a different way of thinking or doing things. While there are many reasons people resist change, here are 7 of the most common:

  1. Fear of Failure – Do I have what it takes?  People can feel stupid.
  2. Loss of control –  I’m not part part of the process!
  3. Loss of face/Status – How will this affect my current position?
  4. Unclear Vision – Where is the organization going?
  5. Impact on Workload – Will this change require more or different work?
  6. Surprise –  These decisions are being imposed on me
  7. Resentments – The last time this happened………unhealed wounds from the past will emerge and can paralyze the process.

If you are leading change within your organization, it might be a good idea to take note of how the True Colors Personalities may be affected by change and learn how you can help them adapt.

As you might expect, each of us has our own unique set of values and needs, and we respond to change in different ways.  And, because True Colors groups individuals into four main color groups, BlueGreenOrange and Gold it is important to know that a  primary  Gold  with Blue  as their secondary color will respond quite differently to change, than say a Primary Gold /Orange.  For the purposes of this article the descriptions that follow refer to the Primary Color responses.

The Gold Personality’s needs, values and stressors

Ask a Gold personality what they need and you are likely to hear things like, consistency; reliability; timelines; structure and clear expectations. They like to be given responsibility, appreciate being respected and their world revolves around organization, rules and standards.

Their most deeply held values include commitment, security, professionalism, loyalty, honesty, time and resources.

Change can stress the Gold types especially if it is frequent, unplanned or unanticipated. They also don’t respond well when many things are going on at the same time, if options are up in the air for too long and if they are not given the opportunity for closure.

Helping Gold Adapt to Change

“If you  want Gold types to perform as only they can rely on them for their responsible nature.”

Given this clear set of needs, values and stress points, generally speaking you will help the Gold types adapt to change if your communication is consistent and you do what you say you are going to do when you say you are going to do it. They will also be more cooperative if you provide them with clear expectations and help them understand how they will fit in once the change is complete.

The Orange Personality’s needs, values and stressors

Ask an Orange personality what they need and you are likely to hear things like, flexibility, variety; attention, interactive experiences. They love the adrenaline rush and thrive on action and activity.

Their most deeply held values include adventure, forthrightness, having choices, being given opportunity to do different things, being productive and doing things quickly.

Change can stress the Orange types if they feel they are being forced to do something another person’s way, and if they feel they have to function under strict guidelines or rules. They also don’t respond well if things are moving too slowly, if they aren’t called upon to use their skills or if they are forced to keep quiet or not participate in what is going on.

Helping Orange Adapt to Change:

If you want Orange types to go along with your ideas then make sure they are in on the decision-making process.

Given this clear set of needs, values, and stress points, generally speaking you will help the Orange types adapt if you are clear and direct in your communication with them, and if you give them options. Of all the True Colors Personalities, the Orange types are the most open to change and will respond well if their desire for flexibility is recognized; and, because they love a challenge, the Orange types could be most helpful in putting your plans into action.

The Green Personality’s needs, values and stressors

Ask a Green personality what they need and you are likely to hear things like time to think, intellectual stimulation and autonomy. They thrive on challenge and need to feel competent. They also enjoy privacy and seek out innovation.

Their most deeply held values include acquiring knowledge, logic, ingenuity and intellectual achievement.

Change can stress the Green types if they don’t know or understand what is going on, if their independence is compromised and if they believe there is no system in place. They also don’t respond well if they are part of a process and their recommendations are ignored. During times of change, the Green types may turn (mentally) inward trying to identify ways to improve the situation.

Helping Green Adapt to Change:

“Encourage and reward the Green type’s achievements by commenting on their creativity, competence, and ability to gather data”

Given this clear set of needs, values and stress points, generally speaking you will help the Green types adapt to change by keeping them well informed, and understand their necessity to question your knowledge and the facts. They will also be more cooperative when you provide positive feedback on the quality of their work, provide opportunities for them to display their competency, task them to assist in complex or analytical types of activities and recognize them for their contributions.

The Blue Personality’s needs, values and stressors

Ask a Blue personality what they need and you are likely to hear things like, acceptance, empathy, understanding and validation. They need to be authentic, can be dramatic, nurturing and thrive when they can be of help.

Their most deeply held values revolve around teamwork, friendship, harmonious relationships and trust.

Change can stress the Blue types when communication breaks down, if there is conflict and if their work environment becomes unsafe, i.e., they feel they can’t ask questions without being put down. They also don’t respond well when their feelings are not being respected and when they observe people not being treated fairly.

Helping Blue Adapt to change

Allow Blue types to be their very best by turning to them for actions that bring out the best in themselves and others

Given this clear set of needs, values, and stress points, general speaking you will help the Blue types adapt to change by validating their concerns, treating people respectfully and offering them opportunities to talk about how they feel. They will also be more cooperative if during a major change you provide them with ways to obtain support and ask them to help in supporting others.

Do you know what your True Colors are?  Find out now by taking our assessment here 

 

Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time. We are the ones we’ve been waiting for. We are the change that we seek.

Barack Obama
Gillian Andries, is a Life and Career Coach and a certified True Colors facilitator  – Take a look at our True Colors Workshop options, then contact her to discuss your specific needs.